Creepypasta from the Crypt Forum Index
 
 
 
Creepypasta from the Crypt Forum IndexFAQSearchRegisterLog inhttp://img.xooimage.com/files103/a/3/0/site-44a5398.jpghttp://img.xooimage.com/files110/8/0/0/bouton-necro-53464fc.jpg

The Thing in the Fields

 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Creepypasta from the Crypt Forum Index -> Propositions de publications -> Creepypasta From The Crypt -> Traductions -> Traductions acceptées -> Archives
Previous topic :: Next topic  
Author Message
Rob Nukem
Inconnu
Inconnu

Offline

Joined: 01 Apr 2012
Posts: 1,302
Localisation: Bachman Hill, Maine
Masculin 馬 Cheval

PostPosted: Mon 14 May 2012 - 16:06    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

When I was young, I lived on a farm in rural Oregon with my parents. I was the only child. We weren’t a big commercial farm. Just a family-type thing. We had five cows, three horses, a small herd of goats, two dogs, and one chicken coop. We also had some Indian Runner ducks we kept mostly as pets. We didn’t really make any money off the place, just enough to sustain the animals and a little extra for ourselves. Money enough to take a decent vacation every couple of years. Dad had his other job in town, an insurance agent. He was the only one around really, the town wasn’t more than about 1,500 people. Mom gave horse-riding lessons as well. We weren’t rich, but we were comfortable.

It was really an easy life (or at least it could have been a lot worse), I went to school, Dad went to work, Mom took care of the animals, then we all had dinner together every night, and I would go to bed while Mom and Dad had a beer or two and watched the news. Sometimes at night I would hear things outside. Mostly just normal stuff. The cows or horses would get spooked by a coyote or something, or I would hear the dogs chasing a rabbit, barking their heads off. Every once in a great while we would find a chicken dead. Dad would always tell me about it but never let me see the body, although I asked frequently. He would keep Mom and I inside until he had gone out, did whatever he did with the body, throw sawdust over any blood, and then life would go on as normal. I assumed it was foxes, as I had seen a couple of them out in the pasture over the years, slinking around back and forth through the grass.

The summer when I was ten years old, I remember helping Mom change the bedding in the horse stalls, when we heard a huge racket going on outside. If you’ve never heard the sounds of a horse in pain, you don’t want to, trust me. It sounds almost like a person screaming. Well that’s what we heard, and one of our horses, the palamino, came running into the barn with a wound on it’s left thigh. Four long marks, like claw marks, ran across it’s body for about a foot. It had blood running down it’s leg, and was limping. I was so scared by the sight of that much blood that Mom locked the horse in a stall and made me go inside with one of the dogs. She told me to lock the door and stay inside until she came in to get me. I did.

Eventually Mom came inside and told me that the horse had hurt itself on the barbed wire that ran the perimeter of the pasture, we owned more land beyond that, but it was mostly forested. I guess I believed her at the time, but at dinner that night I noticed Dad was being particularly quiet and Mom was talking a lot more than she normally did. She was being really animated, and I noticed that Dad had gotten his rifle out and set it by the back door. Usually he only did that when the coyotes had been acting up.

That night I went to bed as normal, but I had trouble falling asleep. I turned on my desk lamp and decided to read comic books until I got tired. I have a very vivid memory of reading Uncanny X-Men and hearing the back door open. Looking out, I could see my Dad by the porch light, lighting a cigarette and holding his rifle under his arm. He started walking over to the driveway and then turned to follow the fence line. I couldn’t sleep until I knew Dad was back safe. I kept coming downstairs with the excuse of getting water to see if Dad was back in the house yet, and each time all I saw was Mom sitting on the couch in the living room, staring at a blank TV screen and looking worried, sighing occasionally. Eventually, about 4 in the morning, I think, Dad did come back, and I was so tired and relieved that I fell asleep as soon as I knew he was home. He never told me what he did that night, but I never thought to ask.

Two months later I was back in school. It rains a LOT in Oregon in the fall, and this day was no different. All I could hear from my bedroom was rain hitting the ground and the aluminum roof of the chicken coop. There was light thunder in the distance, but it was slowly getting closer. I thought I had heard a coyote yapping out around the garage, or it could have been one of the dogs. I looked out, straining my eyes to see whatever there may have been. In a brief and distant lightning flash I saw something. It looked almost like a person, but hunched over, and with a long torso. It was tall, taller than Dad, who was a good six foot four, at least. I just barely caught a glimpse of it on the near side of the garage, then the light faded and I didn’t see it again that night.

There was another dead chicken the next morning. The third in just as many weeks. I told Dad what I had seen the previous night. The color went out of his cheeks momentarily, until he told that the storm must have been playing tricks on me. I accepted that.

Four months after that we lost a cow. It was in the middle of the night, and we all woke up at the same time. There was a lot of noise in the pasture, but only briefly. The cry of a dying animal, and a primitive, guttural yell that I had never heard before. Dad rushed up to my room, I could hear him running up the stairs to my room. He had his rifle in hand, and opened my door. He saw I was awake and told me to stay inside no matter what and try to go back to sleep. I don’t think I have to say that sleep wasn’t really an option any longer, but I did stay in my room, with a blanket held tight around my shoulders and staring out the window. Probably about ten minutes later I heard gunshots in the field. I don’t know what he was shooting at, whether it was whatever had attacked the cow, or the cow itself, trying to put the animal out of it’s misery.

Dad rarely, if ever, talked about that night. I later found out that he had gotten to the cow only to find it ripped open on the ground, bleeding out from it’s torso. The shots I heard were him shooting the cow in the head.

It kept going like that. For years. A chicken or a duck here and there. Something bigger only very rarely. It sounds absurd but I almost came to think of it as commonplace. I only ever caught glimpses of the thing until what comes next. It terrified me. It happened in the middle of the day, over the course of a long weekend when my parents had gone to Seattle to see my uncle, who was ill.

It was on a Saturday afternoon, I was 17 years old. I was out in the barn putting out food for the horses and the dogs. The horses were running around out in the pasture and the dogs were asleep in the corner of one of the horse stalls. I heard something rustling in the tall grass outside in the pasture. The dogs looked around a little bit but didn’t seem to mind. I assumed it was just one of the horses waiting for me to leave so they could eat. I kept going about what I was doing, and in several minutes I thought I heard breathing. I turned to look and it was standing in the door. Tall as hell even hunched over. The sun was streaming in behind it, lighting up all the dust in the air around it like some kind of sickly halo. It was looking at me. Considering me. Maybe it was trying to decide whether or not I was food. I remember swearing, turning, and running as fast as I could for the house, not even thinking. Panic causing my legs to move. It was behind me, not even breathing hard. I heard it’s feet hitting the ground in a constant rhythm. I got to the house, opened the door, slammed it behind me and locked it as fast as I could. I tore through the house, locking every door, and drawing the blinds on every window. I could hear it snarling outside the back door. The dogs were barking at it, but they wouldn’t try to attack the thing. It was too big and they knew it. It roared at the dogs and they ran off, probably to hide in the pasture.

I went to my parent’s bedroom and got Dad’s rifle. I loaded it, set up a chair in the living room facing the back door, and waited. It started prowling around the house, I could hear it’s feet crunching on the gravel of the driveway and the wooden planks of the back deck. It kept walking, back and forth. I thought about trying to look through a window to see it, but I was too scared. Eventually, after hours of hoping it would go away, the sun went down. I turned on all of the outside lights and went up to my room. I opened my window, with the rifle in my hands, hoping to be able to pick the thing off from above. I saw it lurking just beyond the glow from the porchlight. It had long, sinewy arms, and walked on bent knee. It was by the chicken coop. Then it disappeared from view. I heard the chickens squaking and screeching. The thing reappeared with a dead, bloody chicken in it’s hands. It bit off one of the wings with jaws that were dripping with slime and drool and let the dead bird drop to the ground at it’s feet. Then it looked at me. It’s eyes made contact with my eyes. It turned away again, back to the chickens. It came back with another bird, mutilated it in front of me, and dropped it. It went back again. And again. I should have taken a shot at it, but I was astounded and confused trying to figure out what it was doing. Then it hit me, it was a show of power. It was showing me that it was stronger than me. That it could do whatever it wanted to do because I couldn’t stop it. At the same time I felt powerless and sickened. Powerless because what it was saying was true. If it was just that thing and me, I wouldn’t stand a chance. Sickened because I realized what kind of intelligence it would need to be able to convey that message. The thought shook me out of my stupor and I remembered the rifle at my side. It was heading back to the chickens, and I decided that when it came back I would take my shot.

It strode back to the porch. Almost arrogant, walking on bended knee with those arms so long that the chicken was nearly dragging on the ground. I raised the rifle up to my eye, and tried to steady myself. My heart was beating so hard I could see the rifle shaking ever so slightly in rhythm with each heart beat I could hear pounding in my own ears. It raised the body to it’s mouth and just as it was about to put the chicken’s head inside, I squeezed the trigger. The crack of the gun echoed in the now shattered quiet of the nighttime standoff and I heard it howl. A painful, loud, startled howl. I had hit it on the outside of the shoulder. It ran off into the night. I never saw it again. It was still out there, though. It still killed chickens, and other things. More often than before.

I’m writing all of this now because my parents died three weeks ago. They were killed in a collision with a drunk driver. He survived. They left me the farm, and I intend to live here with my own family. I’m 32 now, and I work for an Oregon Fish and Game office in Salem. I’m married to a wonderful woman named Stephanie. We have one son, Zachary, who is four years old. We are expecting a daughter in four months. I’ve come to the farmhouse alone today, I told Steph that I just wanted some time alone in my parent’s house. To deal with some emotions. She was very understanding.

I’ve come back to claim what is rightfully mine. I have Dad’s rifle next to me on the table and it is almost dusk. I’ve also brought several portable halogen lights to set up around the house, and my own shotgun. I’m borrowing a handgun from Joe, a guy at Fish and Game who I work with. When I am done typing this account of my memories, I will print it out, and leave it on the dining room table, along with my wedding ring and my key to the safe deposit box where my will is kept. Everything is loaded and ready. Hopefully I will return here to collect these things and nobody will ever know I wrote this.

Steph, in the event that you are the unfortunate soul to find this, which I’m terrified to think seems a likely outcome; the thought of you having to go on alone hurts me more than anything in this world ever can, know that I love you more than anything and I hope you understand that I am doing this to keep you safe. Zachary, I love you and can only hope you grow up to be a good, kindhearted, and strong man like your grandfather was. To my unborn daughter, if I don’t live long enough to meet you, it will be the single greatest regret of my life.

Tell the police, tell fish and game, call Joe, he’s one of the few people who knows about this. Make this situation known. Eventually someone will kill it, even if it isn’t me. Goodbye for now.

http://creepypasta.wikia.com/wiki/The_Thing_in_the_Fields
________________
« Plains ceux qui ont peur car ils créent leurs propres terreurs. »

- Stephen King

« La peur est le chemin vers le côté obscur : la peur mène à la colère, la colère mène à la haine, la haine mène à la souffrance. »

- Maître Yoda (Star Wars)

« Quand on ne le connaît pas, l'homme est un loup pour l'homme. »

- Plaute (La Comédie des Ânes, vers 195 av. JC)

« There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile.
He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile.
He meets a crooked dog with a crooked smile, which kill some crooked people.
And they all lived together in the darkness of a little crooked house. »


« 'U lupu càngia 'u pìlu ma 'u vìzziu no. » (Le loup change son poil, mais il ne change pas ses vices.)
Back to top
Publicité






PostPosted: Mon 14 May 2012 - 16:06    Post subject: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
Back to top
Teru-Sama
Cryptien
Cryptien

Offline

Joined: 29 Jul 2013
Posts: 55
Féminin Verseau (20jan-19fev)

PostPosted: Sun 18 Aug 2013 - 14:17    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

Quand j’étais jeune, je vivais dans une ferme dans l’Oregon rural avec mes parents. J’étais fils unique. Nous n’étions pas une ferme très productive commercialement, seulement une entreprise familiale. Nous avions cinq vaches, trois chevaux, un petit troupeau de chèvres, deux chiens, et un poulailler. Nous avions aussi des canards indiens que nous gardions plus comme animaux domestiques. Nous n’avions pas beaucoup d’argent, juste assez pour prendre soin des animaux et un peu pour nous. Assez d’argent  pour prendre des vacances décentes chaque année. Papa avait un autre travail à la ville, en tant qu’agent d’assurances. Il était en fait le seul de la région, la ville ne comptant que 1500 habitants. Maman donnait des cours de cheval. Nous n’étions pas riches, mais nous n’étions pas pauvres pour autant.
 
 
C’était vraiment une vie agréable (enfin, elle aurait pu être pire), j’allais à l’école, Papa travaillait, Maman prenait soin des animaux, enfin nous dînions ensemble chaque soir, et j’allais au lit pendant que Maman et Papa prenaient une bière en regardant le journal télévisé. Quelquefois la nuit, j’entendais des choses au-dehors. Des bruits normaux. Les vaches ou les chevaux qui étaient effrayés par un coyote, ou alors j’entendais les chiens chasser les lapins, arrachant leurs têtes. Certaines fois on trouvait un poulet mort. Papa me le disait tout le temps, mais ne me montrait jamais le corps, malgré mes demandes fréquentes. Il voulait nous garder Maman et moi à l’intérieur une fois qu’il avait fini, faisant on-ne-sait-quoi du corps, jetant de la sciure sur le sang, puis la vie reprenait son cours. Je supposais que c’étaient des renards, j’en avais vu hors du champ quelquefois, rodant autour dans les herbes hautes.
 
 
L’été de mes dix ans, je me rappelle avoir aidé Maman à changer la paille dans l’écurie, quand j’entendis un énorme vacarme au-dehors. Si vous n’avez jamais entendu un cheval en train de souffrir, vous ne devriez pas, croyez-moi. Ça ressemble exactement à une personne en train de hurler. Et bien c’est ce que nous avions entendu, et un de nos chevaux vint en courant dans la grange avec une plaie sur la cuisse gauche. Quatre longues marques, comme des griffes, parcouraient son corps depuis son sabot. Un flot de sang coulait de son corps. J’étais terriblement effrayé par tout ce sang, tandis que Maman enfermait le cheval dans un box et m’entraînait dedans avec un des chiens. Elle  m’a dit de fermer la porte et de rester dedans tant qu’elle ne reviendrait pas. Ce que je fis.
 
 
Bien sûr, Maman revint et me dit que le cheval s’était blessé lui-même sur un barbelé qui s’était détaché dans le champ, nous avions plus d’hectares avant ça, mais c’était principalement de la forêt. Je crois que je l’avais crue à l’époque, mais au dîner j’ai noté que Papa était particulièrement silencieux et Maman parlait plus que d’habitude. Elle était vraiment agitée, et j’ai noté que Papa avait sorti son fusil et l’avait posé près de la porte de derrière. Normalement, il le sortait uniquement lorsque les coyotes devenaient trop envahissants.
 
 
Cette nuit je suis allé au lit comme d’habitude, mais j’avais du mal à m’endormir. J’ai allumé ma lampe de chevet et ai décidé de lire une BD jusqu’à ce que je sois fatigué. Il me semble que je lisais X-Men, lorsque j’ai entendu la porte de derrière s’ouvrir. Regardant par la fenêtre, j’ai vu mon père sous le porche en train de fumer une cigarette en tenant son fusil sous le bras. Il a commencé à marcher autour de la route, puis à suivre la clôture. Je ne pouvais pas dormir avant de savoir Papa de retour hors de danger. Je suis descendu avec pour excuse d’avoir soif si Papa rentrait plus tôt que prévu, et j’ai vu Maman assise sur le sofa du salon, regardant la télé d’un air vide. Elle semblait préoccupée, soupirant de temps en temps. Le temps passa, et il était presque 4 heures du matin je crois, quand Papa rentra. J’étais si fatigué que je m’endormis aussitôt que je le sus. Il ne m’a jamais dit ce qu’il avait fait cette nuit, mais je ne lui ai jamais demandé.
 
 
Deux mois plus tard j’étais de retour à l’école. Il pleuvait énormément dans l’Oregon à l’automne, et ce jour ne faisait pas exception. Tout ce que j’entendais depuis ma chambre était la pluie tapant sur le sol et sur le toit en aluminium du poulailler. Il y avait de l’orage au loin, mais il se rapprochait. Je crois avoir entendu un coyote japper près du garage, ou alors c’était un des chiens. J’ai regardé au-dehors, plissant les yeux pour mieux voir. Dans un bref instant d’éclair j’ai vu quelque chose. Ça ressemblait à une personne, mais recroquevillée et avec un long torse. C’était grand, plus grand que Papa, qui faisait un bon mètre quatre-vingt, tout au plus. J’ai à peine aperçu cette chose qu’elle avait disparu. Je ne l’ai plus revue de la nuit.
Il y eut un autre poulet mort le lendemain. Le troisième en à peine quelques semaines. J’ai dit à Papa ce que j’avais vu la nuit précédente, et soudain sa face blêmit, avant de me dire que la tempête m’avait sûrement joué des tours. Je l’ai cru.
 
 
Quatre mois plus tard nous perdions une vache. C’était au milieu de la nuit, et nous nous sommes levés en même temps. Il y eut beaucoup de bruit dans le champ, mais ça s’arrêta vite. Le cri d’un animal mourant, et un hurlement primitif, guttural que je n’avais jamais entendu avant. Papa courut dans ma chambre, je pouvais l’entendre gravir les escaliers. Il avait son fusil dans une main, et il a ouvert ma porte. Il a vu que j’étais déjà levé et m’a dit de rester à l’intérieur, peu importe ce qui arriverait, et d’essayer de me rendormir. Je ne crois pas avoir besoin de le dire mais je ne pouvais juste pas; mais je suis resté dans ma chambre avec une couverture sur mes épaules, en regardant par la fenêtre. Dix minutes plus tard j’ai entendu tirer dans le champ. Je ne savais pas sur quoi il tirait, ni ce qui avait attaqué la vache, ni ce qu’elle était devenue.
Papa n’a jamais rien dit à propos de cette nuit. J’ai su plus tard ce qui était arrivé à la vache, je l’ai trouvée gisant sur le sol, le sang coulant de son ventre ouvert. Les coups que j’ai entendus, c'était Papa qui tirait dans la tête de la vache encore vivante pour abréger ses souffrances.
 
 
  Ça a continué comme ça. Pendant des années. Un poulet ou un canard mort ici et là. Quelque chose de plus gros rarement. Ça semble absurde mais c’est vite devenu habituel. Je guettais souvent la bête, mais ça me terrifiait. C’est arrivé au milieu de la journée, au cours d’un long week-end quand mes parents s’absentèrent pour aller voir mon oncle à Seattle, qui était malade.
 
 
C’était un samedi après-midi, j’avais 17 ans. J’étais dehors près de la grange en train de nourrir les chiens et les chevaux. Les chevaux couraient et les chiens dormaient paisiblement dans un coin. J’ai entendu quelque chose qui bruissait dans les hautes herbes hors du champ. Les chiens regardèrent autour mais ne semblaient rien trouver d’anormal. J’ai supposé que c’étaient les chevaux qui attendaient que je quitte le champ pour les laisser manger. Quelques minutes plus tard, j’ai entendu un souffle. Je me suis retourné...

Et c’était devant la porte. Aussi grand que voûté. Le soleil ruisselait sur lui, révélant toute la poussière dans l’air autour, comme un halo malsain. Il me regardait. Me considérait. Peut-être était-il en train de réfléchir si j’étais ou pas de la nourriture. Je me rappelle avoir sué, couru encore et encore, tournant autour de la maison, ne pensant même pas. La panique me faisait courir vite. Il était derrière moi, ne respirait même pas fort. J’ai entendu ses pieds toucher le sol à un rythme constant. J’ai ouvert la porte de la maison, la claquai derrière moi et la fermai aussi vite que possible. J’ai fait le tour de la maison, fermé chaque porte ainsi que les rideaux de chaque fenêtre. Je pouvais l’entendre gronder depuis la porte de derrière. Les chiens aboyaient après lui, mais ne voulaient pas l’attaquer. Il était énorme, et ils le savaient. Il a rugit sur les chiens et ils se sont cachés dans le champ.
 
 
Je suis allé dans la chambre de mes parents et ai chopé le fusil de mon père. Je l’ai chargé, me suis positionné dans  une chaise qui faisait face à la porte de derrière, et j’ai attendu. Il a commencé à rôder autour de la maison, je pouvais entendre ses pieds crisser sur le gravier du chemin et sur les planches du pont. Il a continué de faire le tour plusieurs fois. J’essayais de regarder par une fenêtre, mais j’étais trop effrayé. Après des heures à prier pour qu’il s’en aille, le soleil se coucha. J’ai allumé toutes les lumières au-dehors et suis monté dans ma chambre. J’ai ouvert ma fenêtre, le fusil en main, espérant avoir assez de courage pour tuer cette chose. Je l’ai vue tapie juste devant la lumière du porche. Il avait de longs bras tendineux, et marchait genoux pliés. Il était devant le poulailler. Ensuite, il disparut de ma vue. J’ai entendu les poulets gratter et hurler. La chose réapparut avec un poulet mort dégoulinant de sang dans ses mains. Il a arraché une des ailes avec ses mâchoires d’où coulait un filet de bave immonde et a laissé tomber le cadavre à ses pieds. Ensuite il m’a regardé. Ses yeux pénétraient les miens. Il s’est retourné soudain, encore vers les poulets. Il est revenu avec un autre oiseau, qu’il a mutilé devant moi, et l’a lâché. Il a recommencé encore et encore. J’aurais dû l’abattre, mais j’étais abasourdi et confus, en train de me demander pourquoi il faisait ça. Ensuite il m’a attaqué, il était fort. Il me montrait qu’il était plus fort que moi. Il pouvait faire ce qu’il voulait, je ne pouvais pas l’arrêter. Je me sentais impuissant et écœuré à la fois. Impuissant, parce que c’était ce que j’étais. Ecœuré, parce que j’ai mis un temps incroyable à réaliser son intelligence. La lutte me sortit de ma torpeur et je me suis rappelé de mon fusil. Il revint vers les poulets, et j’ai décidé qu’il reviendrait mort.
 
 
J’ai enjambé le muret. Presque arrogant, marchant sur ses genoux pliés avec ses bras si longs que les poulets traînaient pratiquement sur le sol, il était là. J’ai monté le fusil sur mon œil, et ai essayé de me calmer. Mon cœur battait si fort que je pouvais voir le fusil trembler. J’ai visé sa bouche juste avant qu’il mette un poulet dedans, j’ai pressé sur la gâchette. Le craquement de la balle le traversant résonna dans la nuit calme, juste avant qu’il ne hurle. Un hurlement de souffrance, pour la balle qui avait atterri dans son épaule. Il a fuit dans la nuit. Je ne l’ai plus revu.
Mais il était encore là. Il continua à tuer des poulets, et d’autres trucs. Plus souvent que jamais.
 
 
J’écris tout ça parce que mes parents sont morts trois semaines plus tôt. Ils ont étés tués dans une collision avec un conducteur ivre. Il a survécu. Ils m’ont laissé la ferme, et j’ai l’intention de vivre ici avec ma propre famille. J’ai aujourd'hui 32 ans, et je travaille maintenant dans un salon de jeu à Salem. Je suis marié à une magnifique femme nommée Stéphanie. Nous avons un fils, Zachary, qui a 4 ans. Nous attendons une fille dans 4 mois. Je suis allé à la ferme tout seul aujourd’hui, j’ai dit à ma femme que j’avais besoin d’être seul quelques minutes dans la maison de mes parents. Elle est très compréhensive.
Je suis revenu réclamer ce qui me revient de droit. J’ai le fusil de mon père près de moi sur la table et il fait sombre. J’ai aussi amené des lampes torches, et mon propre pistolet. Quand j’aurai fini d’écrire ceci, je l’imprimerai et le laisserai sur la table du salon, avec ma bague de mariage et la clé de la boîte où est rangé mon testament. Tout est prêt.
 
 
Steph, juste au cas où tu as le malheur de trouver ceci, sache que te laisser seule me fait plus mal que n’importe quoi d’autre sur cette terre, tu sais que je t’aime plus que tout et j’espère que tu comprends que je fais ça pour ton bien. Zachary, je t’aime et j’espère que tu grandiras en devenant quelqu’un de bien, de courageux et de généreux comme ton grand-père l’était. A ma fille qui n’est pas encore née, si je ne vis pas assez longtemps pour te connaître, ce sera mon plus grand regret.
 
 
Dites-le à la police, au salon de jeu, à tout le monde qui me connaît. Faites que ceci devienne connu. Faites que quelqu’un le tue, même si ce n’est pas moi. Adieu.
 
 
Ca me fait penser à un Enderman ce truc.
________________
???
Back to top
Tripoda
Cryptien
Cryptien

Offline

Joined: 21 Jan 2013
Posts: 6,795
Localisation: Kaulomachie
Masculin

PostPosted: Sun 18 Aug 2013 - 16:26    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

 Magnifique! J'aime l'ambiance rurale, surtout quand elle est si sinistre... Chers Rednecks, je vous adore.

http://creepypastafromthecrypt.blogspot.fr/2013/08/la-chose-dans-les-champs…
________________

Back to top
Visit poster’s website
Chucky
Inconnu
Inconnu

Offline

Joined: 15 Apr 2013
Posts: 2,843
Localisation: Dehors, et toi ? :)
Masculin Balance (23sep-22oct) 蛇 Serpent

PostPosted: Sun 18 Aug 2013 - 16:58    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

J'adore ! J'ai pas compris pourquoi il part ><
Back to top
Teru-Sama
Cryptien
Cryptien

Offline

Joined: 29 Jul 2013
Posts: 55
Féminin Verseau (20jan-19fev)

PostPosted: Sun 18 Aug 2013 - 17:18    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

En fait il part tuer la chose une bonne fois pour toutes.
________________
???
Back to top
Tripoda
Cryptien
Cryptien

Offline

Joined: 21 Jan 2013
Posts: 6,795
Localisation: Kaulomachie
Masculin

PostPosted: Sun 18 Aug 2013 - 17:30    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

 Et il prépare une lettre d'adieu car il n'est pas certain de revenir vainqueur, œuf corse.


J'avoue avoir cru un temps qu'il comptait se suicider, mais c'est parce que j'ai trop l'habitude des clichés...
________________

Back to top
Visit poster’s website
Obsidian
Cryptien
Cryptien

Offline

Joined: 17 May 2013
Posts: 594
Localisation: France
Masculin Gémeaux (21mai-20juin) 鼠 Rat

PostPosted: Sun 18 Aug 2013 - 19:32    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

J'ai eu des méga frissons en lisant la fin, absolument parfait !
________________
Dans un monde parallèle :
"-Docteur, je crois que j'ai un problème... J'ai une femme, deux beaux enfants, un chien, une belle maison. Je ne m'ennuie pas à mon travail, je parle avec tous mes collègues, et depuis quelques temps je me met à siffloter... Docteur, je crois que je suis...

heureux..."
Back to top
mordecai
Cryptien
Cryptien

Offline

Joined: 31 Oct 2012
Posts: 1,303
Localisation: DTC 8D
Masculin Poissons (20fev-20mar) 龍 Dragon

PostPosted: Mon 19 Aug 2013 - 12:54    Post subject: The Thing in the Fields Reply with quote

Juste géniale ! *__*
________________
"TELEVISION IN MY ROOMS !
TELEVISION IN MY BRAIN !
TELEVISION IN THE SKY !
TELEVISION IN YOUR ROOMS !"
Tukatukas , groupe de Punk Rock
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Creepypasta from the Crypt Forum Index -> Propositions de publications -> Creepypasta From The Crypt -> Traductions -> Traductions acceptées -> Archives All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  

Index | How to create a forum | Free support forum | Free forums directory | Report a violation | Cookies | Charte | Conditions générales d'utilisation
Template lost-kingdom_Tolede created by larme d'ange
Edited by the French Creepypasta Community
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group